One on One attention and Home-Like Care, a second Home
Ground Breaking Therapy, Veterans working with Veterans
Life coaching for a better tomorrow
© 2007-2008-2009-2010-2011, Nadia McCaffrey, the Patrick McCaffrey Foundation &  the villages, all rights reserved ©
Formed in 2006-2007, the organization is a peace based organization for
members of the military who have served in the war, we are focusing on the Iraq & Afghanistan conflicts, however, this foundation is to help
all war veterans . We believe the best way to support our troops is to bring them home now and take care of them when they get here.
Hi Nadia,
I hope your well.  A spouse
of a veteran has donated
two wheelchair to veterans
in need.
Let me know if you know
anyone who can use a
powered wheelchair.
Mary
Mary Jalufka, Owner
MindFul Referral Services
PO Box 273282
Concord, CA 94527
Nadia@veteransvillage.org



The mission of Patrick McCaffrey’s Foundation is to promote mental and holistic wellness and
palliative care among veterans returning from the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, especially those
suffering from post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), by providing a live-in retreat village,
wherein with the help of trained professional staff and volunteers, veterans will find inner
healing and an eventual re-entry into society.
The Patrick McCaffrey Foundation is a nonprofit public charity, IRS 501c3, that provides
activities to benefit American military veterans and their families.  The activities include
programs and services that help support veterans of Afghanistan and Iraq wars to transition
back to their families and communities.
Comments from Dr. Jonathan Shay
Soldiers Project Conference
Los Angeles, CA


*Please note, these comments are not exactly transcribed or complete and are written to reflect most of the
general ideas and concepts that Dr Shay presented of during his address to conference attendees.

Recovery happens only in community and it is most meaningful when done among comrades. The idea of combat [traumatic events] is
very important preventative measure to stress injuries (PTSD). The minimum case of community is three people. There is something
that happens when the group is broken. If two leave, one very often has issues with ideas and thoughts of: are the two planning to harm,
exploit or humiliate me? There is also the issue of social distrust; it is one of the most destructive elements of damage to a veteran's
spirit. There is a primary injury ... and then there are complications secondary to the original "primary" injury. In combat, there are many
examples of adaptation of survival. But these adaptations often don't apply in garrison or civilian life. Often, these adaptations continue
once the veterans is no longer in a combat zone ... as in back home with family; and there is an unavoidable impact on the family. One
adaptation that is well known to family members (especially spouses) is the requirement to shut down emotional response - grief
Recovery happens only in community and it is most meaningful when done among comrades. The idea of shut down. Many wives have
described it as the "Ice Man." There often is an active expectation among unit cohesion is very important. Training together and
establishing strong cohesion prior to, during and after unit cohesion is very important. Training together and establishing strong
cohesion prior to, during and after combat [traumatic events] is very important preventative measure to stress injuries (PTSD). The
minimum case of community is three people. There is something that happens when the group is broken. If two leave, one very often
has issues with ideas and thoughts of: are the two planning to harm, exploit or humiliate me? There is also the issue of social distrust; it
is one of the most destructive elements of damage to a veteran's spirit. There is a primary injury ... and then there are complications
secondary to the original "primary" injury. In combat, there are many examples of adaptation of survival. But these adaptations often don't
apply in garrison or civilian life. Often, these adaptations continue once the veterans is no longer in a combat zone ... as in back home
with family; and there is an unavoidable impact on the family. One adaptation that is well known to family members (especially spouses)
is the requirement to shut down emotional response - grief shut down. Many wives have described it as the "Ice Man." There often is an
active expectation among combat veterans (especially those with PTSD) that there is potential for harm or humiliation in the civilian
social arena ... Who are you? What is your game? Many psychologists and psychiatrists have formed a habit of calling this reaction
"paranoia." I disagree with this and urge that caregivers don't call this paranoia. One unknown is what elements of the primary injury are
reversible. But the primary injury rarely wrecks a veteran's life. One example of this behavior is when a veteran takes his child to a
baseball game and sits in the truck way out on the 3rd base line and watches the game from a distance. But it is the complications of
the primary injury that are catastrophic. "Get this guy away from me" is a common reaction of leaders and some care providers.
Management and treatment of the complications from the primary injury is possible ... but not in a dyad; among two individuals who
share a sociologically significant relationship. Recovery from damaged character is possible. The three know things that protect the
mind and spirit for veterans are: cohesion, leadership, and training. There is the farmer analogy: The ancient farmer who sustains a
physical wound or illness during the season where nutrition is low will have a much lower potential for wound healing; same with
veterans in combat. There is also term called "social nutrition." It relates also to cohesion and camaraderie. Then there is something
that vets do to protect themselves from secondary trauma. They set up all kinds of weird shit, like tests of trust because of their
expectations of harm by others through exploitation. And in the case of care providers, there is something known as "splitting" where the
veteran ends the treatment and relationship with the care provider. For managers of care giver staff, it is also important to maintain a
sense of strong community, cohesion and trust among the care provider team. Mental health units are experiencing a rate of
tremendous turnover in community with the current heavy load. There are burnout, meltdown and suicide issues among care providers.
In the care giver community there is the important idea of "struggling safely together." From the aspect of mental health care team
management, it is far more cost effective to get ride of the "regular schedule" mentality and to make the needed changes to adapt to the
patient load. There is also the concept of "moral moron" [no details written down about this]. On sleep ... which is very simple and
extremely important ... but is still a big unsolved problem within DoD culture, especially the macho culture of the Marine Corps. With
sleep deprivation, comes a loss of capacity for "higher mental function" and cognitive frame shifting. Sleep deprivation causes the frontal
lobes to be knocked "offline." I have had positive response to this when I talked about it during sessions with members of the CNO
Strategic Studies Group [Who has attended?]. The problem with military culture is that there is no current "sleep doctrine." Sleep is not a
logistical concern as is beans, bullets and bandages. Concern for sleep logistics simply does not happen within the culture, especially
in combat theatre. The same could be said about the issue of hydration 20 years ago. Where you would have a particularly macho
Marine say, "I can run a 20k and not have to use the water in my canteen, what's your problem?" Today, at Camp Lejuene, there are urine
color charts to check the color of Marines' urine to educate them on the recognized issue of hydration safety. But the sleep culture has
not yet changed. In the realm of sleep, it is not yet supported within the military culture. And the consequence of that is the sleep deprived
mind inside the combat zone  ... the literal voice of the sleep deprived  brain is, "Kill 'em all and let god sort 'em out."



Hi Nadia,

Below is some of our information, I'm not sure if we have e-mailed this information to you before. There is
an attachment of a flyer for our Fallen Heroes Program.
Tutor Request Form -is what we fax the families if they are interested in signing up.

We would like to provide services for more families but will need your help in having the families get in
contact with us or obtain their information.

Below is a description of the services that the children or spouse of the fallen will receive.


Professional Tutors of America would like to offer the following services to the nationwide surviving
dependents of the fallen in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars:

1. A minimum of one hour of free tutoring per week.

2. The tutoring will be for K-12 students and surviving spouses who are continuing their education.

3. The tutoring will take place in home or a nearby location.


We have been in the business of helping kids for over 25 years. The company is owned an operated by a
veteran, Bob Harraka.

Below is a link from the Orange County Register that was written about our Fallen Heroes Program.

http://www.ocregister.com/ocregister/news/local/brea_lahabra/business/article_1595735.php

Thank you Nadia. I will call to update you.
If you have any questions please let me know.

Sincerely,

Ernesta Brito

Area Coordinator
Ernesta@professionaltutors.com
(714) 784-3455 or (800) 832-2487 Ext. 255
The Patrick McCaffrey Foundation, named after Sergeant Patrick R. McCaffrey, the first California National
Guard, since WWII, (from the 579th Engineer Battalion from Petaluma), to lose his life in Iraq on June 22,
2004, is committed to bringing healing and hospice, as well as career counseling and training, to veterans
returning from the war in Iraq and Afghanistan. Its founding member and President, Nadia McCaffrey,
mother of Sergeant Patrick McCaffrey, wants to carry on the work her son would have pursued had his life
not been curtailed so prematurely. Patrick, who did not expect to be deployed to Iraq, decided to honor the
commitment he made to help people by going to Iraq as a leader and Combat Life Saver, bringing healing
and love to his fellow soldiers and the Iraqi children.

Volunteer Advocates Serve Vets

BRETT: Volunteer advocates serve vets

By BRIGID BRETT
For the San Diego North County Times | Posted: Friday, January 22, 2010 12:00 am

Although Chaplain Fred Tittle left Vietnam in 1970, he only filed for compensation from the Veterans
Administration in 2003.
"I never considered filing a claim; as a matter of fact, it was filed for me ... I'm not sure if I ever would have
unless prompted by someone else, another combat veteran. This is one of the reasons I do the work that I
do with injured veterans; I know how difficult it is to ask for help."
Tittle is a former combat-disabled Marine who is working as chaplain at Moffett Field, located near
Sunnyvale, with combat-disabled veterans as well as active duty members. Most of the injured have
traumatic brain injury and PTSD.
The last time I talked to him, he had just helped an Iraq veteran and his family who were living in a
homeless shelter find "a more suitable, calm place to stay and get them connected with help and
resources."  The couple have a young daughter ,and the wife was about to give birth at any moment.
On a given day, Tittle will drive a soldier to her doctor's appointment, defuse a potentially violent altercation
with the police and help a confused and frustrated veteran fill out his mountain of forms so he can get his
disability compensation. He does not get paid for any of this.

John Keith, an Iraq veteran, was at the lowest point of his life when he e-mailed Nadia McCaffrey last year.
McCaffrey's son, Patrick, was killed in Iraq in 2004, and she has since become an advocate and "kind of a
mom" to many young veterans who have been flailing, utterly alone and desperate in the months and years
after serving their country.
In physical and emotional pain, Keith felt like he couldn't keep trying to get his benefits, trying to deal with
the VA, trying to find medications that wouldn't make him have black-outs. It was through McCaffrey's
emotional support and practical guidance that he was able to regain his strength and start advocating for
himself ---- and others. McCaffrey does not get paid for saving and rebuilding lives.
Mary Ellen Salzano started the California Statewide Collaborative for Our Military and Families because
she saw the need to save lives by not only connecting the dots, but connecting the humans. She spends
most of her waking hours helping people who are struggling with a myriad of issues and a sense of deep
desperation, to get in touch with people who might be able to help them. She does not get paid.
The VA has seen a 26 percent increase in suicides, mostly among 18- to 29-year-old veterans who served
in Iraq and Afghanistan.

It's time to create a new kind of work force ---- of paid advocates.

BRIGID BRETT writes from Valley Center. Contact her at
brigidbrett@aol.com.